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Beyonce vs Jay Z: Femail explores which half of the music couple is the most successful artist – Daily Mail

By Nola Ojomu For Dailymail.Com
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Beyoncé and Jay Z are officially sitting on top of the music throne these days after becoming the two artists with the most Grammy nominations in history.
The superstar couple made the milestone achievement after the nominations for the 65th Grammy Awards were revealed on Tuesday, with the pair now tied with a total of 88 nods each.
Though Beyoncé led the way with an impressive nine nominations for the upcoming Grammys, the 40-year-old hitmaker failed to completely overtake her spouse – who previously held the record for most nominations of all-time.
Back in November 2021, Jay-Z became the most Grammy-nominated artist when the three award nods he received that year took his total up to 83.
However, the 52- year-old rapper still managed to keep himself at the top alongside his wife after landing five nominations for next year’s ceremony.
The latest achievement for the couple is just one of the many ways in which the superstar duo have proven themselves to be the perfectly matched music power couple.
From platinum-selling albums and lucrative business deals to grossing millions of dollars on their tours, the music couple are leaps and bounds ahead of their peers in many regards.
But which artist comes up top when compared to each other? FEMAIL takes a look into how their achievements rank up against each other.
ACCOLADES: Beyoncé received more nominations and awards wins (542) than Jay-Z (266) 
Beyoncé (pictured left at the 2004 Grammys) and Jay-Z (pictured right at the 2013 Grammys) are two of the most decorated artists in the music industry
Beyoncé first started winning awards during her time in Destiny’s Child – pictured with Kelly Rowland (left) and Michelle Williams (right) in 2001
The singer has even won awards for her many music collaborations with her husband – pictured in 2015
GRAMMYS: Beyoncé (28) vs Jay-Z (24)
Beyoncé currently has the same total of nominations as her husband at 88, but she has walked away with more awards since landing her first nomination as part of Destiny’s Child in 2000.
At present, Beyoncé currently has 28 Grammy awards – which makes her the most awarded female artist in history.
The singer is currently tied with Quincy Jones in the second spot for most Grammy wins of all-time behind conductor Georg Solti, who holds 31 awards.
If she wins just four of her nine nominations next year, then she will become the most awarded artist in the history of the Grammys.
Meanwhile, Jay Z has 24 Grammys to his name after receiving his first even nomination back in 1999. He is currently tied with Kanye West as the two-most awarded rappers in Grammys history.
The hitmaker’s distinctions have been given out as a result of his work as a rapper, writer and producer. The musician’s most successful years have been in 2009, 2010 and 2012, when he took home three awards during each year’s ceremony.
BET AWARDS: Beyoncé (37) vs Jay-Z (31)
From his 35 BET Awards nominations, Jay-Z has walked away with seven gongs. However, the rapper has also won an impressive 24 gongs at the BET Hip Hop Awards during his career.
Meanwhile, Beyoncé has won 32 BET Awards and has 5 BET Hip Hop awards to her name.
In October 2021, the rapper was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Beyoncé has yet to be given the honor.
In Beyoncé received the 2014 MTV VMA Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award (pictured) and before that she was given the inaugural Billboard Millennium Awards at the 2011 Billboard Awards 
OTHER ACCOLADES
When it comes to the Billboard Music Awards, Bey has walked away with 27 wins compared to her husband’s six victories. 
Meanwhile, Beyoncé has 29 MTV Video Music Award moon man gongs compared to the 14 gongs Jay-Z has won over the years.
Elsewhere, Jay only has three American Music Awards to date, while Bey has bagged 14 so far.
In October 2021, the rapper was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Beyoncé has yet to be given the honor as she was not eligible for consideration until 2022.
Beyoncé received the inaugural Billboard Millennium Awards at the 2011 Billboard Awards and received the 2014 MTV VMA Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award.
The singer has also received as Critics’ Choice Movie Award for her Dreamgirls (2006) soundtrack single, Listen, and in 2017 Bey was given a Peabody Award for Entertainment.
MUSIC SALES AND CERTIFICATIONS: Beyoncé has sold more records (200 million) than Jay-Z (125 million) 
Beyoncé has sold over 200 million records worldwide as a solo artist, as well as the 60 million records she sold in Destiny’s Child
Following a recent certification upgrade by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the singer is now the third best-selling solo female artist of the digital era
BEYONCE: 16 platinum selling albums and 44 platinum selling singles
Beyoncé has sold over 200 million records worldwide as a solo artist, as well as the 60 million records she sold as a founding member of Destiny’s Child.
Following a recent certification upgrade by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the hitmaker is now the third best-selling solo female artist of the digital era.
Her biggest hits include Halo and Single Ladies, which are now nine-times Platinum, while her other singles such as Crazy in Love and Irreplaceable at six-times Platinum.
Platinum denotes sales of 1 million units in the United States.
Meanwhile, her albums Dangerously in Love (2003) and I Am… Sasha Fierce (2008) have both gone six-times platinum. 
Over her career so far, she has 16 albums that have gone platinum and above, including live albums and her work in Destiny’s Child. 
With the latest RIAA refresh, Bey’s digital sales alone now sit at 113.5 million.
It’s official, see photo. #magnacartaholygrail is @S_C_’s 12th @RIAA Platinum album award. http://t.co/3cJRZNkIvA pic.twitter.com/DdIfOsXVJ8
Jay has sold more than 125 million records worldwide since bursting onto the music scene in 1996
JAY-Z: 17 platinum selling albums and 31 platinum selling singles
Jay has sold more than 125 million records worldwide since bursting onto the music scene in 1996.
His best-selling album is Vol. 2… Hard Knock Life, which has gone five-times Platinum (five million copies sold) since it was released in 1998.
The rapper has not only enjoyed success with his solo album releases but with collaboration albums he’s recorded with fellow music artist such as R. Kelly and Linkin Park.
His 2011 collaboration album with fellow rapper Kanye West, Watch the Throne, has gone five-times platinum since its release. 
Meanwhile. Empire State of Mind featuring Alicia Keys has become his best-selling single after going three-times platinum.
Over his career to date, the rapper has 17 platinum selling albums and 31 platinum selling singles and collaborations to his name.
TOURS: Beyoncé has grossed over $250 million on her last solo tour compared to Jay-Z’s $48 million
Thanks to multiple successful world tours, Beyoncé landed the title of the highest grossing Black artist of all time in touring history
Beyoncé became the first black female artist to headline Coachella in 2018, earning a reported $8 million
BEYONCE: Grossed $250 million on her most recent solo tour 
Thanks to multiple successful world tours, Beyoncé landed the title of the highest grossing Black artist of all time in touring history.
Altogether her tours have a revenue exceeding $1 billion to date. Her 2016 Formation World Tour, which ran from April to October, grossed $256 million.
During her The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour, which ran from 2013 to 2014, the performer pulled in $229 million.
Meanwhile, Beyoncé became the first black female artist to headline Coachella in 2018, earning a reported $8 million for her iconic 105-minute set. Indeed, the singer has headlined multiple festivals over the years.
Prior to her solo career, the star also embarked on three successful world tours as part of Destiny’s Child.
However, Beyoncé has also hit the road with her husband – with the decision proving to be extremely lucrative for both.
The couple’s original On The Run tour in 2014 earned them $109.6 million from 21 shows. They enjoyed even more success with their On The Run II tour in 2018.
The tour made $253.5 million, according to Billboard, as they performed in 48 stadiums across Europe and North America. Forbes estimated that the pair made around $5 million per night.
Jay grossed $48.7 million on his last solo tour in 2017, averaging an impressive $1.5 million per show – pictured in 2019
Beyoncé has also hit the road with her husband – with the decision proving to be extremely lucrative for both as they landed one of the highest grossing tours in history
JAY- Z: Grossed over $48 million on his last solo tour 
Jay-Z is an artist who loves to the road with others, but not because he can pull in earning on his own. The rapper grossed $48.7 million on his 4.44 tour in 2017, averaging an impressive $1.5 million per show.
It was a significant increase in earning compared to his 2013-2014 Magna Carta Tour which reportedly made $37.4 in ticket sales.
Meanwhile the rapper’s 2009-2010 Blueprint 3 Tour grossed $33.1 million for 39 shows. 
As mentioned above, the rapper has made a large profit from the joint tours he embarked on with his wife.
However, he also pocketed a decent amount during his Legends of the Summer Stadium tour with Justin Timberlake in 2013, which grossed $75 million.
His Watch the Throne co-headlining concert tour with Kanye West ran from 2011 to 2012 and took in $75 million. Kanye pocketed just under $600,000 per night while Jay Z took home $800,000.
The rapper has also teamed up with the likes of Eminem, Mary J Blige and R. Kelly for joint tours during his career.
Elsewhere, he has famously headlined music festivals across the globe including his game-changing 2008 set at Glastonbury in England.
BUSINESS DEALS: Jay-Z has amassed a net worth of $1.1 billion compared to Beyoncé’s $426 million
In 2016, Beyoncé co-founded Ivy Park, an athleisure clothing line which now has a reported net worth of $931 million
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After Beyoncé’s iconic Coachella set, she dropped her epic Homecoming concert film on Netflix in 2019. Variety reported that Bey’s deal with the streaming giant earned her an estimated $60 million. 
Beyoncé has also brought in bucks from her starring turns in films like Dreamgirls (pictured), The Lion King, Austin Powers: Goldmember and Cadillac Records
BEYONCE: Has amassed a total net worth of $426m thanks to brand deals
Bey is no stranger to inking lucrative deals alongside her work as a singer and performer.
She signed a jaw-dropping $50 million deal with Pepsi in 2012, while she was paid in $6 million worth of restricted stock units after performing at an Uber company event in 2015.
The singer also reportedly charges $2 million to perform at private events such as Isha Ambani’s extravagant 2018 wedding.
After Beyoncé’s Coachella set pulled in a viewership of 41 million – compared to 24 million in 2017 – she dropped her epic Homecoming concert film on Netflix in 2019. Variety reported that Bey’s deal with the streaming giant was for three projects and earned her an estimated $60 million.
Elsewhere, the singer also has released her own fragrances, raking in over $500 million to date.
Beyoncé starred as the voiceover role of Nala in the cinematic The Lion King remake for a reported $25 million, and she also produced an accompanying album titled, The Lion King: The Gift. She went on to release the accompanying Black Is King feature film on Disney Plus.
Before that, Beyoncé brought in bucks from her starring turns in Dreamgirls, Obsessed, Austin Powers: Goldmember and Cadillac Records. According to a report from 2006 in China Daily Beyoncé earned $12.5 million for Dreamgirls, twice the amount she brought in for Austin Powers.
In 2016, she co-founded Ivy Park, an athleisure clothing line named after her daughter (Blue Ivy) and Parkwood Park in Houston, where Beyoncé used to work out. In 2020, Beyoncé relaunched the clothing line under a partnership with Adidas, which now has a net worth of $931 million.
Beyoncé owns music production company Parkwood Entertainment, a management, production, and entertainment company. The company involved in the business of movies and fashion designs along with the music and has a net worth of $1.5 billion.
In 2019, Roc Nation announced a deal with the National Football League which sees Jay-Z  help shape the NFL’s social-justice program and oversee the league’s entertainment programming – pictured with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell
Jay is the founder of the entertainment company Roc Nation, which also serves as his current record label. He also made a clever investment in luxury champagne brand, Armand de Brignac (pictured right in 2008)
JAY-Z: Has amassed a net worth of $1.1 billion thanks to business investments
Born in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, Shawn Carter aka Jay-Z started his rap career as a teenager in rap battles. When none of the major record labels were willing to sign him, he then simply went on to start his own record label, Roc-A-Fella Records.
This entrepreneurial spirit is part of the reason why he became Hip-hop’s first billionaire in 2019, making him the third wealthiest African-American and the wealthiest American musician at the time, according to Business Insider.
He is the former president of Def Jam Recordings, and the founder of the entertainment company Roc Nation, which also serves as his current record label. The entertainment and management company also having stakes in startups – with one key success being Rihanna’s Savage x Fenty lingerie line.
His clothing company Rocawear raked in $700 million before he sold it for $204 million. Elsewhere, he owns the New York 40/40 Club sports bar.
He also founded the sports agency Roc Nation Sports and is a certified NBA and MLB sports agent. In 2015, Carter acquired the tech company Aspiro.
Jay-Z famously bought Tidal for $56 million and Forbes soon reported that it was worth $600 million. However, the rapper’s net worth jumped 40 per cent after he sold a majority stake in Tidal for $297 million – netting $149 million in cash and stock.
The hitmaker also made a clever investment in luxury champagne brand, Armand de Brignac, which Forbes reports he sold 50 percent of in a deal that values the liquor company at around $640 million.
In 2021, Beyoncé and Jay-Z partnered with Tiffany for its ‘About Love’ campaign. Details of the contract haven’t been disclosed, but it is safe to assume the stars might have a multi-million dollar deal.
Published by Associated Newspapers Ltd
Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday & Metro Media Group

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Paramount's 'Blue's Big City Adventure' based on 'Blue's Clues' series – Detroit Free Press

Warren native Matt Stawski went from filming local rock bands to directing a major feature film based on a classic children’s TV series.
Stawski is the director behind Paramount Plus’s live-action animated film “Blue’s Big City Adventure,” released on the streaming service Friday. It’s based on the Nickelodeon series “Blue’s Clues & You!,” a revival of the 1990s show “Blue’s Clues,” featuring a courageous animated dog and its owner pursuing clues and solving problems. The film centers around the host of “Blue’s Clues & You!,” Josh, played by Joshua Dela Cruz, visiting New York for an audition. Tagging along is Blue and a few more familiar faces.
Original “Blue’s Clues” host Steve Burns appears in the film for a nostalgic touch.
This is Stawski’s first-ever feature film, which just so happens is also a musical. He has a thing for musicals.
Q: Tell us how you got into the business of filmmaking.
A: Oh, man, I actually went to Cousino High School in Warren, and they have a radio-TV station. My friends and I were able to borrow their gear all the time and we just started shooting local bands around Detroit.
From there, I kept doing music videos and started building a reel. While I was going to Columbia College for directing, I started booking jobs for companies out here in California, doing hip-hop videos and motion graphics. Before I knew it, right when I graduated, I moved out to LA and had a job doing music videos. Sixteen years of music videos, and that took me straight into features, where I am now.
Q: What’s been some of your best work or sets that you’ve been on? I hear you’ve done work for Train, CeeLo Green and worked on sets for Nickelodeon.
A: One of the more well-known videos that I’m really proud of is the CeeLo Green, “Forget You” video. That was really fun because he wrote a sort of Motown song. Obviously, my whole life, I’ve been inspired by Motown. We went down to Hitsville USA, and we just went to all the spots on West Grand and really soaked in the history of Motown. I was able to sort of tap into some of that Motown doo-wop style in that CeeLo video.
It’s been a balance of doing videos that I have to do to pay the bills and videos that I get to have creative freedom and make a really colorful, fun, exciting video.
Q: I got a chance to watch Blue’s Big City Adventure and it definitely took me back to my own childhood. What was that process like for you in terms of directing?
A: It was really fun. A lot of it was really new and a lot of it I had a lot of experience with. I have a lot of experience doing music videos and musicals. The musical element of it fell right in place, what was new for me was shooting in New York City out on the streets that was very new and incredible to see how that works. How you get film permits to shoot in some of these iconic locations, how you have to wait something out on the city street with pedestrians there, and how to do crowd control that was all new to me as well as shooting animated characters. That was a brand new learning experience for me as well, because on set with multiple animated characters in a scene with a live-action human, you have to make sure that you have all of the eyelines correct, you have to make sure that the live-action actors are interacting with the animated characters and holding their arms the right way and looking in the right directions.
You have to make sure you capture with digital technology how the lighting is so when you’re animating the characters in post-production, the lighting looks natural on the animated characters. There was a lot of learning for me for sure, but we pulled it off, and it was really fun. I had a great crew to work with that’s what helped me achieve the film.
Q: If you’ve been to New York before, you could easily say while watching the film: “That’s so New York-like.” For example, when Blue and Josh arrived in New York there were little scenes where we saw pizza boxes on top of the trash cans. How did you really capture the true New York?
A: Before filming this, I’ve been there just on vacation. I shot one video there years ago with CeeLo. I did a lot of research and I asked a lot of the locals. We really spent a lot of time making sure that those iconic locations that we featured in the film were locations that we could build a musical out of and really interact with the architecture and the geography of New York City.
We wanted to make sure that we captured some of the best locations and really did our research as to – where can we film in Central Park? What can we do around Bethesda Fountain? What fields can we shoot in for the big dance in the end? What are the best angles and even researched other films that shot in New York and how they shot some of the different locations and what lenses they used? What’s the most flattering way to make New York look because this is a kid’s movie? We wanted to make sure we presented a sort of candy-coated version of New York City, a very colorful representation of the city.
Q: It was definitely interesting to see the previous Blue’s Clues characters in the movie. Why was that a decision to include them?
A: Steve came around for a lot of the 25th anniversary promo stuff they were doing for Blue’s Clues. He really went viral, a year and a half ago when he came out and talked to the adults and told them why he left and that he was still their friend. It exploded, I think Nickelodeon really realized how important he was, as well as Donovan (Patton), who played Joe, how important they were to the younger generation and to the older generations, that grew up with Blue’s Clues.
It was a no-brainer, to bring them in and have them reprise their roles in such a funny, sort of family-friendly adult way.
Q: What do you want people to get most out of this film? Since it’s like multiple generations are watching it.
A: I think the most important thing to me that I realized when we were going into it was this idea of inspiring kids to take chances, to follow their dreams, to sort of leave their little comfort zone, leave their bubble of safety, to chase their dreams. I think that the film does a good job showing Josh and Blue in storybook land and when they leave to go to New York City, the city’s very scary. But all they have to do is sort of close their eyes and listen to the music of the city, and find their little bits of wisdom from their friends around them that give them advice along the way.
All the kids growing up on Blue’s Clues kind of have to realize that they might have to venture out of their comfort zone and go find their city or find their place where they want to live. And maybe if they want to stay in their own city that they grew up that’s great, but really embrace the culture and meet new people that you didn’t really grow up with, find people that make you learn new things. That’s really important and I want people to get that out of the film for sure.
Q: What did you get out of making this film? And also, is this the first big title that you’ve directed?
A: This is my first feature film. I’ve done some TV pilots in the past, and I’ve done some short films, but this is my first feature. I learned how important kids and family spaces are and how important it is to get the educational and inspirational aspects of the film right because little kids really look up to these characters. It’s really important, how you show them on screen and how you portray certain events. I really learned how to make a film in the kid space. That was probably my biggest learning experience because a lot of the music videos I’ve done have been more in the adult space. I was able to really play with that fantasy surrealist imagination, stuff that t kids are so great at. I was able to sort of become a kid again, making this movie.
Q: Looking a little bit into the future what other projects do you have in store – I hear that recently you sold your musical horror films, to Universal Pictures. What’s up with that?
A: We’re in development on the Monster Mash right now with Universal and we’re working on just getting the script in a good place so we can shoot it. I’m really excited for that because obviously, I am obsessed with Halloween. I grew up in Michigan, going out to the cider mills, going to Blake’s. Going up to Tilson Street in Romeo and seeing all the houses decorated. My girlfriend and I like to come home every year for Theatre Bizarre at the Masonic Temple. Detroit just goes off for Halloween. It’s one of the Halloween capitals of the country.
More:Detroit’s Theatre Bizarre fills 8 floors, 350K square feet of Masonic Temple
There’s a lot in the Monster Mash film, there’s a lot of good Easter eggs that really tie into Detroit and a lot of our Halloween culture. I’m really excited to film that, we’re still in the script phase, and we’re still in development. It might be a minute before we shoot that. But other than that, I’m trying to develop more musical concepts. At some point in my life, I would absolutely love to come back and make a true Motown musical.
Q: I have to ask, are musicals like your thing?
A: I’ve tried to watch almost every musical that’s ever existed. I’m not as big on actually going to the theater, it’s something I never really did. Just because it was always really pricey, so I always watch musical films. I love the fact that with musicals, you can break so many rules, one genre film where you can go full fantasy, and the audience accepts it and that’s a really fun space to play with. I absolutely adore musicals and I would love to make many, many more.
More:Temptations’ ‘Ain’t Too Proud’ musical finally makes its way home as Detroit run begins
Q: Before I let you go, can you give your best advice to aspiring filmmakers?
A: Number one, is to create what you know. Don’t try to make a movie or take a job in an area that you’re not passionate about. If you grew up with a certain type of music if your grandma and grandpa played a certain type of music, and you’re obsessed with that music, make a movie about that music.
If you grew up in a neighborhood that has something very specific to it, make a movie about that neighborhood. If you had a best friend, that was a character, if you could remember anything they said in their whole life and all the advice that they gave you, make a movie about that friend. Whatever interests you, whether it’s historical, whether it’s pop culture, make a movie about that because when you go and pitch a movie to Hollywood, you have to be the person in the room that knows the most about that topic.
More:Tim Allen back in red suit for ‘The Santa Clauses’ series on Disney+
Q: One more thing when and where can the audience see Blue’s Big City Adventure?
A: Blue’s Big City Adventure comes out on Paramount Plus on Nov. 18. You can get a free trial if you don’t already have it. I would advise everyone to make sure their volume is cranked up to 11, and watch it on the biggest screen possible. Because it’s a big fun movie, the kids are going to hopefully get up and dance and sing along to it.

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ICYDK: Music NFTs Also Generate Royalties – Lexology

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The newest case against American DJ 3LAU is very timely, with “music NFTs” becoming a growing trend in the music industry.
“Music NFTs” and Copyright Law. As a refresher, an NFT is a unique cryptographic or blockchain-based asset linked to another asset or piece of content such as digital artwork, a ticket, or a musical album. To give an analogy, purchasing a so-called “music NFT” is like purchasing a physical CD from a music store (though artists typically offer NFT holders additional benefits or utility, such as early access to music releases and VIP concert tickets). This comparison is especially important as more songwriters, artists, publishers, and record labels choose to release music through NFTs. Under copyright law, typically the author of a particular work has the exclusive right to reproduce that work. Accordingly, whenever a composition or master is streamed, downloaded, stored on a vinyl record, or even printed as sheet music, it implicates reproduction rights that the author exclusively controls. In a music production agreement, it is common for authors or owners of a song to agree to split the net revenues from reproductions of the song (a “royalty”) as recognition for their respective ownership in the underlying work. Because of this, the sale of an NFT, when linked to an mp3 or other digital version of a song, would also generate royalties.
The Music Royalty Landscape. In the U.S., there are several kinds of music royalties, which depend on whether the ownership rights are in the composition or master. Use of a composition may be subject to performance royalties (applicable to public performances such as live performances, and AM/FM radio), mechanical royalties (applicable to digital or physical reproductions including via digital music services such as Spotify and YouTube), synchronization royalties (applicable to synchronization in television, film, social media apps, etc.), or print royalties (applicable to reproductions as sheet music). Use of a master may be subject to performance royalties (applicable to digital or satellite radio but not including AM/FM radio), reproduction royalties (applicable to sales of physical or digital reproductions), or synchronization royalties (applicable to synchronization in television, film, social media apps, etc.). Notably, use on one platform can implicate multiple types of royalties.
Luna Aura v. 3LAU Entertainment. On November 9th, Angela Anne Flores professionally known by her stage name, “Luna Aura”, sued 3LAU for breach of contract and unjust enrichment. 3LAU engaged Flores in 2017 to write and record the song called “Walk Away”. Per the agreement, 3LAU was required to give Flores an appropriate writer credit and featured artist credit; 50% of the net royalties payable to 3LAU on any “sales of the master”, paid “in the same manner…and at the same times” as 3LAU’s royalties; and a pro-rated share of any income 3LAU receives with respect to mechanical reproductions of the composition.
The song “Walk Away” was first released as a single in late 2017, then as a track on the Ultraviolet album in early 2018. Flores had been credited as a co-author and featured artist on the 2017 single and 2018 album. When 3LAU re-released the Ultraviolet album, including the individual tracks, as a series of NFTs earlier this year, 3LAU did so allegedly without notifying or obtaining Flores’ permission or license. 3LAU reputedly generated more than $11mm in revenue from the NFT auction. However, Flores claims she did not receive any royalties in connection with the NFT auction and to add more insult to injury, 3LAU offered her $25,000 after the fact, as compensation for said auction. Thus, the reason for the suit. Flores is seeking damages and an accounting for the amount of royalties she is owed.
The major takeaway from this complaint is that “music NFTs” can be considered reproductions and have the potential to create additional revenue streams. Songwriters, artists, publishers, and labels alike should look back on any agreements they may have entered regarding the exploitation of a song so they know their rights and obligations with respect to any royalties.
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Passion not enough to make ends meet, indie artists find – VnExpress International

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In 2017, Ho Tram Anh released a dream pop track called “Haze” that found attention and praise from the indie community. But it took her five more years to put out her first studio album – “The Poetry of Streetlights” – with 11 tracks.
Asked why it took her so long after her first single to release a full album, Anh said there were several reasons. First, she had to invest a lot of time because it was her debut album. Then she had to deal with a very tight budget. As an indie project, she couldn’t access a lot of resources and had to do most of the work herself.
Many indie artists share Anh’s struggle. They have to cover all the expenses for studio sessions, music videos and album promotion, which is not easy for young people just hitting their creative strides.
Quoc Trung, one of the most influential music producers in Vietnam, said young artists, especially non-mainstream ones, making it big on the local music scene was a rare thing because they have to strike a balance between making ends meet and making music.
“I’ve heard some indie artists say that they have to work some other job for 2-3 months to return to music,” Trung told the Thanh Nien Newspaper.
The 56-year-old music producer said he sympathized with young indie artists having to work different jobs because not being able to focus fully on their passion would affect the quality of their music.
“If you don’t focus (fully) on music, your music won’t be good enough and you won’t make money. You need to know what you really want,” he said.
Trung also advised young indie artists to find ways to take their music to a wider audience. They need to to promote their music in as many places as possible, without being concerned about the audience number.
Ngot Band is an example of indie artists making the most of their chances. The band was formed on November 11, 2013. Then unknown, with an original lineup of three members, Ngot began their journey performing for free at coffee shops in Hanoi.
Four years later, 3,000 tickets for their live show sold out in just three days.
Young indie artists can approach distributors to help take their music to digital music platforms like Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube and SoundCloud to reach both domestic and international listeners.
For her debut album, Anh called for crowdfunding to cover the production costs. In 2020, indie band Bluemato also used crowdfunding for their debut album “The Wind Blows”.
While crowdfunding has become an indie way for indie artists to improve their music quality and reach a greater audience, many continue to walk a tightrope, balancing their passion with putting food on the table.
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Doom Eternal composer Mick Gordon claims id Software lied regarding soundtrack controversy (Update: Bethesda responds) – Windows Central

Doom Eternal composer Mick Gordon claims id Software lied regarding soundtrack controversy (Update: Bethesda responds)  Windows Central
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Samuel Adams Cincinnati Taproom 4th Anniversary | Samuel Adams Cincinnati Taproom | Food & Drink, Live Music – Cincinnati CityBeat

When: Sat., Nov. 19, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
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Rhinegeist Brewery
0.18 miles
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Coal mining is a dangerous job. In Afghanistan, kids often do much of the work – 90.5 WESA

LEILA FADEL, HOST:
While world leaders have been talking about limiting global warming at the U.N. climate summit, Afghanistan has been moving in another direction and ramping up its production of coal. Mining for that coal is dangerous and sometimes deadly. And as NPR’s Arezou Rezvani reports, in Afghanistan, kids often do much of the work.
(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)
UNIDENTIFIED MUSICAL ARTIST: (Singing in non-English language).
AREZOU REZVANI, BYLINE: You don’t have to travel too far outside of Kabul to see signs that coal is king in Afghanistan’s economy these days.
So we left Kabul just a couple of hours ago. We’re about to make our way through the Hindu Kush mountains on these backbreaking roads built to buy the Soviets years ago. And already we’re passing truck after truck after truck, all of them full of coal. Some are carrying so much, it’s just spilling over the sides. When the old Afghan government collapsed last year, its economy collapsed with it. Foreign governments withdrew billions of dollars in economic assistance when the Taliban returned to power. Now, after a year of isolation, the cash-strapped Taliban government is increasing its coal production and exports to fill the void. And those bringing that coal to market aren’t who you’d expect.
(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTSTEPS ON GRAVEL)
REZVANI: We’ve driven through mountains, through riverbeds, and we’re now walking this final stretch to get to the coal mines. And headed in the other direction, headed down the mountain are a lot of miners with coal dust all over them. And some of these faces we see are quite young.
It’s not uncommon to see children work hard jobs in poor countries – in factories, farms or food stalls. But the scene atop this mountain is still astonishing. Inside a narrow tunnel, the distant, faint glow of headlamps appears first.
FAZEL: Be careful here.
REZVANI: OK.
As we go deeper, the young faces come into focus.
UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #1: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: Older boys are swinging pickaxes, digging for coal. Some are busy fixing wood beams for the crumbling tunnel walls.
(SOUNDBITE OF WOOD BEING SANDED)
REZVANI: The younger boys escort coal-laden donkeys out of the mines. Among them is 12-year-old Mansour. When he emerges from this mountain’s womb, the boys outside greet him with a tune from a toy flute. They take turns playing.
(SOUNDBITE OF FLUTE)
REZVANI: It’s a humble celebration for making it out alive, they say.
(SOUNDBITE OF FLUTE)
REZVANI: Like everyone here, little Mansour wears no helmet, no goggles, just a pair of cheap rubber shoes he sliced open to air out his little black toes peeking out.
MANSOUR: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: “My workday starts at dawn,” he tells me. He shepherds donkeys up and down this mountain for 10 hours a day.
MANSOUR: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: “The work’s not hard,” he says, but he looks bone tired. His delicate hands are black and calloused.
ABDUL: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: Much of the coal Mansour takes down is carried out of the earth by older boys, like Abdul Salaam. He’s 17 and already a veteran of these lands.
ABDUL: (Through interpreter) I’ve been working here most of my life. I started working in these mines when I was 9.
REZVANI: The child labor that existed under the old government has grown worse in the last year. The Taliban government wants to fix that. But with an economy in shambles, more families are sending younger kids here, says Jawad Jahed, the engineer who oversees this mine for the government.
JAWAD JAHED: (Through interpreter) Kids under 18 aren’t supposed to work here. But our people are so poor, families have no choice. They send their children to work because they need the money. And it’s hard for us to turn them away.
REZVANI: The boys earn a few dollars for a day’s work. It’s a strong, steady wage in these cruel economic times, even if it comes at great risk. Heavy rains last winter caused one of the tunnels here to collapse. A dozen workers were killed. When I asked 17-year-old Salaam if he’s worried about getting hurt, he shrugs.
ABDUL: (Through interpreter) It is the work of destiny. If it is my destiny to die in these mines, then so be it.
REZVANI: But that destiny may already be taking shape. As the sun sets, we head back down the mountain. A few young miners are sitting on a ledge overlooking this vast, blackened landscape. One of them pulls out the flute.
(SOUNDBITE OF FLUTE)
REZVANI: He plays it for a few seconds. Then he stops.
UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #2: (Speaking Dari).
UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #3: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: “Carry on,” the other boys say. But he can’t.
UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #4: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: After a long day at the mines, he doesn’t have the breath to go on.
Arezou Rezvani, NPR News, Nahrin, Afghanistan.
(SOUNDBITE OF HARIPRASAD CHAURASIA’S “RAAG BHUPALI”) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.
Have a tip for the WESA newsroom? Email [email protected].

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Future Sound 6ix: Faculty of Music teams up with YWCA, Nick Nurse Foundation to run music workshops for youth – University of Toronto

UTC

When Ellie Hisama was a professor of music at Columbia University, she founded a program called “For the Daughters of Harlem: Working in Sound” that brought together young, racialized women from New York City public schools to engage with music.
Now, Hisama, dean of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Music, is partnering with the YWCA on a similar project, bringing a group of racialized 14- to 20-year-old female-identifying and gender-nonconforming youth from local public schools to the University of Toronto’s Electronic Music Studio, where they’ll learn about music and audio production in two full-day workshops.

“Future Sound 6ix: Connecting Youth and Music Industry in Toronto” is being supported by the Nick Nurse Foundation, which is founded by Toronto Raptors head coach Nick Nurse and supports social justice initiatives that improves the lives of children and young adults through music, sports and literacy.
“I was excited to come to Canada and I was told Toronto is incredibly diverse – which it is,” says Hisama, who joined U of T last year.
“I wanted to connect Toronto and U of T.”
With the guidance of professors, students and guest instructors, the workshop’s participants will focus on music criticism, music production and audio engineering. The workshops will culminate with a public performance showcasing the students’ efforts.
Nurse, for his part, says he loves sharing his passion for music.
“I’m a big University of Toronto fan, a big Faculty of Music fan and I’m a big music fan – so this was a really good one on a lot of levels for our foundation to support,” Nurse told U of T News. “I think it’s a really cool, unique, cutting-edge project as well.
Nick Nurse (photo by Thearon
W. Henderson/Getty Images)

“Maybe it creates a spark for a lifelong passion that turns into a career for a young person, or maybe it improves somebody’s self-image or gives them a chance they wouldn’t have had. As our foundation continues to grow, we are doing things at the introductory, grassroots level like this all the way to scholarships and career development.”
The idea for the U of T project began coming together earlier this year after Hisama and Megan Chang, a Canadian pianist and sessional instructor who holds both a master’s degree and doctorate in music from U of T, discussed ways to help train musicians outside U of T and better engage with the surrounding community.
“I strongly believe that there are a lot of kids out there who have so much to offer creatively, but they just don’t have the exposure or resources,” Chang says.
“Monica Lin, the part-time community development and program facilitator at the YWCA, and I were talking, and she was trying to find something for young women to do. It just so happens that Ellie had done the ‘Daughters of Harlem’ project and we were like, ‘Maybe we could do the same exact thing in Toronto.
“It’s great that Nick Nurse has decided to fund this for us – and his vision for kids and music education all fits.”
Adrian Berry, a U of T graduate and Future Sound 6ix program co-ordinator, and Eliot Britton, director of U of T’s Electronic Music Studio and associate professor of composition, music technology, and digital media at the Faculty of Music, will help run the workshops. Student ambassadors will also be on hand to act as mentors for the students.
Hisama says she hopes the program helps make the Faculty of Music more accessible to the wider community.
“We are sometimes thought of as a strictly Western European classical music institution, or that we aren’t interested in popular music,” she says. “I hope we’ll be able to dispel that and that this is a step towards a larger change.”
To that end, Hisama says the Faculty of Music also recently launched a task force on community engagement.
“I’m trying to bring together this energy and knowledge and excitement about doing something that is part of the fabric of our community.”
 
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We wish to acknowledge this land on which the University of Toronto operates. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Huron-Wendat, the Seneca, and the Mississaugas of the Credit. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land. Read about U of T’s Statement of Land Acknowledgement.
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From podcasts to holograms, Chestnut Grove students work in new STEM lab – Yahoo News

Nov. 18—Chestnut Grove Elementary fifth grader Henry Robbiano used to have trouble speaking to groups of fellow students, but that changed when he began his own podcast in the school's new STEM-based learning space last month.
Principal Rebekah Higgins said before the learning space was designed, Robbiano's reserved nature presented a hurdle.
"In the first podcast he did this week, he shares a story about how nervous he was when he did his speech in front of the Student Council when he ran for president," Higgins said. "He said, 'With (the podcast), I don't have to worry about a crowd. I can enjoy speaking with people without being in front of a large crowd.'"
The new learning space was presented to the public on Wednesday but Robbiano and nine other students in fourth and fifth grades have been hard at work for almost two months, designing images in augmented reality, learning to code on their iPads, producing music, and interviewing people with the new built-in studio.
Fourth grader Jayden Orr produces instrumental music with GarageBand software and collaborates with others in the learning space by writing music for their projects.
"With these different music icons, I can plug them into this grid on the computer and make different sounds," Orr explained to Decatur City Schools Superintendent Michael Douglas and Wanda Davis, elementary curriculum supervisor.
Orr sends his music to other classmates' Apple devices, where Robbiano uses them for his podcast and fourth grader Mazen Mozeb uses them for his augmented reality projects.
Mozeb utilizes a computer application called CoSpaces Edu to create his virtual content. He scans a device with the app called a Merge Cube, an actual physical cube, and it transforms into a hologram.
Robbiano's podcast Wednesday featured Douglas and Davis and he spoke with them about Decatur schools and asked what leadership traits a person should strive for.
"When I come over here and see stuff like this going on, it does give me encouragement to do my job well when I see students doing well," Douglas said during the podcast.
"That does make sense," Robbiano replied. "You want students to do the right thing."
Robbiano also uses GarageBand software on his laptop to record his podcasts and uses a production mixer to adjust volume levels on his microphones and headphones.
"These buttons here (on the mixer), they have sound effects," Robbiano said. "You can even make your own custom sounds on here."
Higgins said the new room, named the Launch Pad by Chestnut Grove students, offers vast opportunities for those interested in STEM-related fields (science, technology, engineering and math.)
"Prior to this, we had our robotics team and our green power team and a technology class that was more for upper grades, but this is a whole different level," Higgins said. "Our media specialist and I started brainstorming in the spring and I didn't know at the time that Faith (Plunkett), our district technology coach, had partnered with Ed Farm to launch a learning space here."
Ed Farm is a Birmingham-based nonprofit organization that provides schools and communities with innovative tools and strategies to further promote STEM learning.
"This is our second Ed Farm space," said Ed Farm CEO Waymond Jackson. "Our first space was built in March in Birmingham City Schools and it's called the South Hampton Innovation Lab. At Chestnut Grove, this gives them a lot of opportunities. They're learning to code, they're learning artificial intelligence, how to build web content for media … anything that's needed for the 21st century workforce in the state of Alabama."
Plunkett said Chestnut Grove's learning space cost $125,000 and was fully funded by Ed Farm "through a variety of grants for innovation." She said renovation for the learning space began in May and was completed in September.
[email protected] or 256-340-2438.
Sharon Stone, 64, shared a topless bikini photo on Instagram, writing: “Gratefully Imperfect on a Perfect Day.” Fans adored the glowing, confident shot.
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Tim Allen gave insight into his visit with Jay Leno, who is recovering at a burn center following non-fatal injuries from a gasoline fire.
"I got to see a test screening of a movie and had to sign an NDA. The movie was a live-action version of Avatar: The Last Airbender, and it sucked. People at the screening gave it such negative feedback that I guess the studio decided to promote it way less than they originally planned to. "View Entire Post ›
The North Korean leader is extremely secretive about his family, but his wife and daughter were at the latest launch.
The juxtaposition…………..View Entire Post ›
Please hold all other news for the next 24 hours, because Celine Dion just rendered half the internet incapable of moving after debuting her latest Paris Haute Couture Fashion Week look. While arriving at the Folies Bergere Music Hall in Paris, Dion channeled her inner chic flight attendant with Alexandre Vauthier Haute Couture.
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Television icon Jay Leno was seen in a hyperbaric chamber as part of his treatment after his car "erupted" in flames and he was rushed to the hospital on Saturday.
Just the right amount of spandex.
Chris Hemsworth told Vanity Fair that he is planning to take a good chunk of time off work once his press tour for the Disney+ series “Limitless” wraps. In the fifth episode of the series, Hemsworth meets with a doctor and it’s revealed that the “Thor” actor has a genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease. As […]
Kendall Jenner made the decision to pee on the way to the 2022 Met Gala, doing so around her two-piece Prada gown that she wore for the event.
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Zoë Kravitz revealed that she's rethought many of the decisions she made when she was younger — including the ink collection that is featured on her body — in GQ's latest cover story

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macOS Ventura not currently so ace for computer music makers: check your DAW and plugin compatibility before you upgrade – MusicRadar

MusicRadar is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Here’s why you can trust us.
Multiple developers advise against installing macOS 10.13 too soon
macOS Ventura (10.13) has been available for a couple of weeks now, and for musicians, the not-at-all-surprising news is that you should probably hold off installing it for a while.
Pro Tools Expert (opens in new tab) has put together a pretty exhaustive list of which music software is certified as Ventura-friendly, but the bottom line is that, even if you find that your DAW is supported, there’s a very good chance that some of your plugins currently aren’t.
This isn’t to say that they definitely won’t run, but until all of your instruments and effects are greenlit for Ventura – or all of the ones you really care about at least – it makes sense to stick with the OS version you’re currently rocking. 
Among those companies currently advising that you shouldn’t upgrade if you’re using some or all of their software are Arturia (opens in new tab), Cherry Audio (opens in new tab), Eventide (opens in new tab), GForce (opens in new tab), iZotope (opens in new tab), Native Instruments (opens in new tab) and Output (opens in new tab).
Don’t forget about your audio interface, either – you need to ensure that this is compatible with macOS 10.13 before you make the jump, too.
Once you do install Ventura, you’ll be able to benefit from a number of new features, including Stage Manager – a new tool that automatically organises open apps and windows – and Continuity Camera, which enables you to use your iPhone’s camera as your webcam.
Rest assured, though, that there’s nothing in macOS 13 that’s going to dramatically change your music-making life, so don’t worry about installing it until it’s safe to do so.
I’m the Group Content Manager for MusicRadar, specialising in all things tech. I previously spent eight years working on our sister magazine, Computer Music. I’ve been playing the piano, gigging in bands and failing to finish tracks at home for more than 30 years, 20 of which I’ve also spent writing about music technology. 
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Moog Music's Minimoog Model D is back in production · News RA – Resident Advisor

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Coal mining is a dangerous job. In Afghanistan, kids often do much of the work – Northern Public Radio (WNIJ)

LEILA FADEL, HOST:
While world leaders have been talking about limiting global warming at the U.N. climate summit, Afghanistan has been moving in another direction and ramping up its production of coal. Mining for that coal is dangerous and sometimes deadly. And as NPR’s Arezou Rezvani reports, in Afghanistan, kids often do much of the work.
(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)
UNIDENTIFIED MUSICAL ARTIST: (Singing in non-English language).
AREZOU REZVANI, BYLINE: You don’t have to travel too far outside of Kabul to see signs that coal is king in Afghanistan’s economy these days.
So we left Kabul just a couple of hours ago. We’re about to make our way through the Hindu Kush mountains on these backbreaking roads built to buy the Soviets years ago. And already we’re passing truck after truck after truck, all of them full of coal. Some are carrying so much, it’s just spilling over the sides. When the old Afghan government collapsed last year, its economy collapsed with it. Foreign governments withdrew billions of dollars in economic assistance when the Taliban returned to power. Now, after a year of isolation, the cash-strapped Taliban government is increasing its coal production and exports to fill the void. And those bringing that coal to market aren’t who you’d expect.
(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTSTEPS ON GRAVEL)
REZVANI: We’ve driven through mountains, through riverbeds, and we’re now walking this final stretch to get to the coal mines. And headed in the other direction, headed down the mountain are a lot of miners with coal dust all over them. And some of these faces we see are quite young.
It’s not uncommon to see children work hard jobs in poor countries – in factories, farms or food stalls. But the scene atop this mountain is still astonishing. Inside a narrow tunnel, the distant, faint glow of headlamps appears first.
FAZEL: Be careful here.
REZVANI: OK.
As we go deeper, the young faces come into focus.
UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #1: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: Older boys are swinging pickaxes, digging for coal. Some are busy fixing wood beams for the crumbling tunnel walls.
(SOUNDBITE OF WOOD BEING SANDED)
REZVANI: The younger boys escort coal-laden donkeys out of the mines. Among them is 12-year-old Mansour. When he emerges from this mountain’s womb, the boys outside greet him with a tune from a toy flute. They take turns playing.
(SOUNDBITE OF FLUTE)
REZVANI: It’s a humble celebration for making it out alive, they say.
(SOUNDBITE OF FLUTE)
REZVANI: Like everyone here, little Mansour wears no helmet, no goggles, just a pair of cheap rubber shoes he sliced open to air out his little black toes peeking out.
MANSOUR: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: “My workday starts at dawn,” he tells me. He shepherds donkeys up and down this mountain for 10 hours a day.
MANSOUR: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: “The work’s not hard,” he says, but he looks bone tired. His delicate hands are black and calloused.
ABDUL: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: Much of the coal Mansour takes down is carried out of the earth by older boys, like Abdul Salaam. He’s 17 and already a veteran of these lands.
ABDUL: (Through interpreter) I’ve been working here most of my life. I started working in these mines when I was 9.
REZVANI: The child labor that existed under the old government has grown worse in the last year. The Taliban government wants to fix that. But with an economy in shambles, more families are sending younger kids here, says Jawad Jahed, the engineer who oversees this mine for the government.
JAWAD JAHED: (Through interpreter) Kids under 18 aren’t supposed to work here. But our people are so poor, families have no choice. They send their children to work because they need the money. And it’s hard for us to turn them away.
REZVANI: The boys earn a few dollars for a day’s work. It’s a strong, steady wage in these cruel economic times, even if it comes at great risk. Heavy rains last winter caused one of the tunnels here to collapse. A dozen workers were killed. When I asked 17-year-old Salaam if he’s worried about getting hurt, he shrugs.
ABDUL: (Through interpreter) It is the work of destiny. If it is my destiny to die in these mines, then so be it.
REZVANI: But that destiny may already be taking shape. As the sun sets, we head back down the mountain. A few young miners are sitting on a ledge overlooking this vast, blackened landscape. One of them pulls out the flute.
(SOUNDBITE OF FLUTE)
REZVANI: He plays it for a few seconds. Then he stops.
UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #2: (Speaking Dari).
UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #3: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: “Carry on,” the other boys say. But he can’t.
UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #4: (Speaking Dari).
REZVANI: After a long day at the mines, he doesn’t have the breath to go on.
Arezou Rezvani, NPR News, Nahrin, Afghanistan.
(SOUNDBITE OF HARIPRASAD CHAURASIA’S “RAAG BHUPALI”) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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Music Production 101: 15 Ideas to help you finish a project – hypebot.com

Stuck on a project? You know it needs something but you’re not sure what? Well, here are 15 different strategies to get you out of this rut and turn ideas into masterpieces…
by LANDR
Music production is a challenging process.
Whether you’re a seasoned pro or an emerging creator, you’re bound to encounter some roadblocks along the way.
The good news is that it’s normal—even if it’s no fun while it’s happening.
If you find yourself stuck or unable to move forward, you’re probably looking for some quick advice to get you back on track.
That’s why in this article I’m giving my top 15 general tips to help you get the most out of your workflow.
Let the music production tips begin!
It might seem simple, but it’s worth it to spend some time getting comfortable with your DAW.
Once you know its basic functions you’ll work faster and more fluidly with additional confidence.
There’s nothing worse than getting stopped in your tracks trying to figure out a standard function while your fresh ideas are slipping away.
The antidote? Take a few minutes every session to learn something new about your DAW’s workflow.
It could be as simple as looking up a few key commands, or as serious as taking on its comping workflow.
The key is to keep building your skills all the time!
Whether you’re a seasoned pro or an emerging creator, you’re bound to encounter some roadblocks along the way.
Hot tip: Want more creative advice and inspiring tips? Subscribe to the LANDR Newsletter to get our best posts in your inbox.
It’s important to take regular breaks to give your ears a rest during long sessions.
Once ear fatigue sets in, you’ll have difficulty making decisions on critical issues like mixing or audio editing.
The best way to fix it is to avoid it altogether. Make sure to break up long sessions with short breaks away from your speakers to let your ears recharge.
Headphones are especially prone to causing this effect, so take care when using them for long periods.
But the single most important rule? Turn it down.
Monitoring too loud is not only more fatiguing, it’s less accurate. Blasting your speakers drives their amplifiers closer to the limit, causing a change in response. It can even affect your listening environment in small spaces.
Keep it at a reasonable volume, and don’t stress your ears—they’re the only pair you’ve got!
Many producers express the common frustration that they can’t finish a track.
If you have plenty of ideas and few complete songs, you may be experiencing this issue as well.
While there are plenty of creative strategies that can help you breakthrough blocks, it’s important to set your sights on the goal.
Do your best to orient your process around the big picture, rather than obsessive details.
After all, it doesn’t have to be perfect, it just has to be done!
Try a songwriting challenge or just set yourself a goal without stressing over the quality of the results.
Doing so will hone your skills and help you grow.
You should always be on the lookout for new ways to improve as a producer.
Even if you have the basics down, learning continuously is important to keep your ideas fresh and your practice evolving.
Luckily, there are plenty of places to find inspiration and get caught up on new techniques.
Whether you prefer to learn from videos, tutorials or other producers, the most important thing is to keep your curiosity sharp.
Getting stuck in a rut is another common complaint, especially among producers who work in a single genre.
Do your best to orient your process around the big picture, rather than obsessive details.
If you find yourself going through the motions, do whatever you can to shake up your workflow.
That could mean trying a new genre, an unconventional technique or even a new instrument!
Plenty of notable figures swear by the benefits of “beginner’s mind” to unlock new creative insights.
Luckily, it’s easy enough to cultivate in music by simply trying something new.
Are you a guitarist? Try writing a song with synth.
Do you start every track with the drums? Try writing the chord progression first.
There are endless ways to shake up your production process, so don’t be afraid.
Once again, every piece of advice has another side to it.
In many situations in music production, the simplest solution is best.
Many of the best producers are known for their distinctive sound.
Consistency and the ability to reproduce results are considered valuable in any industry—music production is no different!
If you have presets, samples or techniques that just work, don’t be afraid to use them.
Eventually, your go-to methods will form your signature producer pallet.
In many situations in music production, the simplest solution is best.
Don’t be afraid to use loops, samples, pitch correction or other time saving measures if they help you stay focused and make headway.
In many cases, your listeners will never be able to tell you did something ‘the hard way’ even after you agonize over it in the studio.
Part of developing intuition as a producer is knowing when something is good enough.
If it truly is, you’re ready to move on!
The flipside of the previous tip is that sometimes, more effort does produce superior results.
Some processes like audio editing reward careful attention and stick out when done hastily.
Make sure you understand the situations where putting in the time is worth it. Then knuckle down!
Chances are the most time consuming tasks can be made shorter with practice and expertise—see tip number one!
It’s easy to get bogged down by fixating on what you could do—if only you had a particular piece of gear.
That mindset stops you from moving forward with what you can do in the moment.
Try to reframe it as discovering new possibilities with what you already have.
A good sound is a good sound, no matter where it came from.
The best producers understand their gear inside and out. They know how to squeeze the most performance out of even weak points in their studio.
Use what you have, and don’t sleep on the full potential of your equipment.
On the other hand, any artisan needs quality tools to do their work.
A good sound is a good sound, no matter where it came from.
Learn to recognize when your equipment is holding you back and do your best to put together a suite of tools that work.
That doesn’t mean you have to spend a lot—just make sure you have quality basics that get the job done.
Luckily for modern producers, capable production gear is pretty accessible in 2022.
As long as you have a serviceable audio interfaceDAW and headphones, you’ll be able to make strides with your production skills!
The best way to avoid an aimless workflow is to go in with a plan.
What do you intend to accomplish in your session? Or on a more fundamental level, why did you choose that plugin? And how exactly do you plan to use it?
Knowing the answers to these questions will give you the confidence to move forward and make good decisions.
With the above tip in mind, nothing ever goes perfectly according to plan.
The best producers are generalists with the skills and mindset to make the most of any situation.
If the song calls for something out of the ordinary, you shouldn’t hesitate to embrace it.
That means knowing a little bit from all the disciplines in music.
Are your synth presets too boring? Basic synthesis technique lets you build your own.
How about trying to write a bassline? Maybe you’ll come up with something if you know how to improvise.
And of course, mixing your own music gives you the final say over its aesthetic presentation.
No one should be expected to learn everything about music production on their own.
Luckily for today’s producers there’s a treasure trove of educational material available online.
Whether you need DAW tutorials, beat making tipsgear guides or mixing help, chances are someone has covered the answer to your question already.
Take a look online and find some resources you can turn to when you need a helping hand
For example, you can always visit the LANDR Blog and subscribe to the LANDR Youtube channel!
On the flipside, there are plenty of voices out there with advice to give about music production.
While most of them offer compelling information, some are more valuable than others.
Treat every perspective with the assumption that no one is correct 100% of the time.
Some approaches may work for you and others may not.
Just don’t take anyone’s opinion as the settled truth on any subject in music.
Instead, see it as a direction to experiment and find out for yourself!

Production techniques are every producer’s bread and butter.
But understanding the deep structure of music itself can elevate your skills above the rest.
Understanding the deep structure of music itself can elevate your skills above the rest.
If you work primarily in the DAW, music theory might not seem relevant at first.
But anytime you deal with chordsprogressionsmelodiesstructure or rhythm, there’s some underlying musical theory that can help you navigate them.
You’ll even find that knowing theory gives you access to new ideas!
It may feel discouraging when your creative flow isn’t as easy as it usually is.
But the important thing is to keep going. The tide will eventually change and you’ll be back in the driver’s seat of your own creativity.
Until then, use these 15 tips to help you make headway.
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