Master Gardener: Beloved tree takes beating in storm – The Livingston County News

Jul 05, 2022 by beatzzshopp - 0 Comments

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Overcast. Low 68F. Winds SSE at 5 to 10 mph..
Overcast. Low 68F. Winds SSE at 5 to 10 mph.
Updated: July 4, 2022 @ 11:37 pm
Julie Brocklehurst-Woods/Special to The Livingston County News My tulip tree is thinner on top, but hopefully can be salvaged.
Julie Brocklehurst-Woods/Special to The Livingston County NewsMiraculously, this rose bush and other plants in this front garden bed were not damaged by the crashing tree branches, nor during cleanup.

Julie Brocklehurst-Woods/Special to The Livingston County News My tulip tree is thinner on top, but hopefully can be salvaged.
Julie Brocklehurst-Woods/Special to The Livingston County NewsMiraculously, this rose bush and other plants in this front garden bed were not damaged by the crashing tree branches, nor during cleanup.
Trees. I’ve lived most of my life in homes with mature trees. I love the shade they offer on a warm summer day, the sound of the leaves rustling in a breeze, the beauty of fresh foliage in the spring, and sometimes color in the fall. There isn’t much I enjoy more than a walk in the woods. Our current home is about 60 years old, with some trees that were planted not long after construction.
I have two favorite trees: a tulip poplar in our front yard, and a sugar maple in the middle of the back yard. Both of these are natives. The tulip tree demands my attention in spring, especially when it blossoms beginning around Memorial Day, continuing for at least a couple of weeks in June. It’s hard to see some of the blossoms because it is so tall and dense, but I can tell when they have opened by the humming sound of native bumblebees.
Its a big tree: in it’s natural habitat, tulip is the tallest tree easy of the Mississippi River. It seems to thrive in communities of tulip trees, which I have encountered in Highland Park in Rochester, and in Letchworth State Park. Nevertheless, ours has grown and bloomed well for the 17 years we have lived in this house. It’s a little messy, with litter from blossoms in spring, large leaves in fall, and seeds over the winter. But I love this tree, it is well worth the effort.
This beloved tulip poplar sustained significant damage in the recent windstorm that swept through Geneseo and Livonia. A large trunk broke off of the top of our tree. Branches crashed onto our roof, then most bounced or slid to the ground. It had passed peak bloom time, but many shattered blossoms were mixed in with the debris.
Looking up at the damaged tree, it appears it wasn’t the central leader, the main center trunk, that was damaged. This side trunk broke off because it had begun to rot in the center. Hopefully the main trunk is still in good condition. Perhaps the tree will be healthier without that infected trunk. I have a call in to the arborist we have used previously. He won’t be here for awhile, there are others in greater need. But once he removes the rest of the broken trunk, I hope all will be fine. He will assess the tree health and let us know.
In a recent column I mentioned the work of entomologist Doug Tallamy, regarding the large number of insects supported by native trees. Insects are critical to our ecosystem. More than 95% of our insect population is beneficial, only 3% are a agricultural and nuisance pests, and 2% are benign. Native oaks support 534 varieties of insects. The top five trees that support the most insects include Prunus (black cherry and its relatives), willows, birch, and poplar.
If you want to support the environment in a bigger way, plant one of these trees.
Julie Brocklehurst-Woods has been a Master Gardener Volunteer with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Livingston County since 2002. She enjoys helping all gardeners become successful gardeners, especially helping people identify tools and strategies to prioritize and simplify their gardening tasks. She will answer gardening questions by email: [email protected].
Johnson Newspapers 7.1

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